Love and Basketball: Full Court(ship) Press

I believe in courtship. In love and in life. I wholeheartedly endorse it.

Inquisitive passer-by: “Courtship, huh? Isn’t that an antiquated term for dating, circa Jane Austen?” 

Lindsay the Letter Writer: “Who says old-timey things are bad? Have you not seen Downton Abbey? That stuff’s legit right now.”

Inquisitive passer-by: “Well played, Auntie Quated. Well played.”

If I believe in a living Savior from 2,000 years ago, it makes perfect sense that I’d follow a concept from the 1500s, as well. 😉

Courtship is more than a guided process of a man wooing a woman. It’s also the practice of testing out new things.

I think the 90-day new-hire probationary period is a form of courtship. The employer is checking to see if the employee really is qualified. And the employee is discovering whether or not they fit in at their new job.

We’ve got buyer’s remorse, so you can even court a car.

Or that 60-day money back guarantee. Courting a product.

Basketball

So why’s it so weird that a man would court a woman? What’s wrong with trusted leaders with experience in a marriage relationship guiding people they love through a journey of discovery?

If 50% of marriages allegedly fail, perhaps society should change their pre-marital approach.

Of all the marriages I’ve seen that first went through a courtship, 100% of them have succeeded.

I’m reporting my findings of watching this hypothetical love and basketball game between dating and courtship. The full court pressing in of courtship dominates the casual game plan of dating.

So, I choose courtship. Even if it means I’ve been single for 27 years. Even if both of my younger siblings are in a relationship and I’m not. Because if waiting for the one right man means a better marriage for me later, I’ll wait.

Breaking All the Blogging Rules

I break the rules of blogging all the time.

I let this one go dormant. I promised to keep it active again after reinstating it. And then…dormancy. And then I pledged to activated it once more. And then I went dark again. I can tell you–as a person who knows how to do blogging the proper way–I do not do this blog the proper way.

I think I use all my creative energies writing for The Bug Man’s blog. No, that’s not a plug for my company’s website, but it is an honest referral to where I am now. All of my SEO thinking and content creating is over there. Congrats, bosses, you have the best of my creative mind. It’s ok, though. They are worthy to receive my creativity.

There are many things that I often want to say on this blog, I just don’t get around to it. Because of the late nights. Because it takes too much energy to spin my own brand. To spin me. To create a buzz about myself. It seems narcissistic. It seems like bad personal business.

Here’s something interesting: I have been writing more letters. I have my own personal embosser with a Letters from Lindsay seal. So, if nothing else, I’m at least writing letters from Lindsay. You just don’t see them. I’m sorry, internet.

Maybe I’ll return to you…some day.

p.s. And I didn’t even post a picture. Cardinal rules: broken! 😉

A Poem About Acorns

In an attempt to be a better, more socially-appropriate adult, I created and brought a hostess gift for Thanksgiving. In the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, I’d scoped out inexpensive ideas for hostess gifts. Thanks to keen observation and my friend Bethany’s The Simple Day blog, I came up with an idea. The whole thing swirled around one item: acorns.

You can check out a picture of my hostess gift at instagr.am.

I went shopping at Wal*Mart and found the glass container on clearance for $1.50. Then, I hit up the yard at my old apartment complex and acquired the acorns. However, after I added the acorns to the container, it just didn’t seem like enough. So I resolved that I would write a poem that described the recipient of the gift, the gift itself and the occasion. If you look closely at the picture, you can read the poem. For the sake of context, I’ll inform you that I spent Thanksgiving with my closest friend and her family. The poem is primarily about her step mom since she was the hostess.

The poem’s pasted below. It’s called: sOAK it in.

Let us gather together
And not rush hastily forward
Savor the sensation
Of sensing where the Spirit’s stirring

We measure milestones
In cycling seasons
And reminisce
Moments and movement

Like an acorn falling from a tree
Deposits drop from our mouths
Another seed is sown
So another tree can grow

Writing a War

I wish I could write a war

And win it with a word

My pen alone cannot prevail

But prayer can

Move heaven

And shake the earth

Until all the silt is sifted away

You can depend on me

To pen and pray these prayers

And fiercely fight

With every word I write

Kristian Stanfill – Day After Day – CD Review

A new voice could become an old favorite…

Unless you’re a close follower of the Passion movement, you probably don’t know who Kristian Stanfill is. Though a new voice, be assured that sixstepsrecords has made a credible addition to its already impressive repertoire of artists.

With a full-length album already under his belt, the Day After Day (EP) is a preclude to Stanfill’s next full album, out next year.

The lyrics on Day After Day clearly stand out on the EP. At times, the instrumentation behind the words fades into the background as the verses and choruses ring out like declarative Psalms. In a heavily-instrumented music world, this is refreshing.

Conversely, the up-tempo “Say, Say” features driving instrumentation that immediately draws attention from the listener. The dynamic chasm between “Say, Say” and the songs before it causes “Say, Say” to be the only original track that is easily remembered.

Rounding out the EP is a cover of Hillsong’s “The Stand.” It’s easy to enjoy this track because of its strong lyrics and familiarity. The choice to put “The Stand” at the end of the EP is intelligent because the listener comes away feeling satisfied.

Overall, Day after Day is a solid combination of songs if the listener gives the opening tracks a chance to sink in. In an over-crowded music market, it’s hard for entire CDs to truly stand out. With patience, audiences could truly latch on to this EP.

Visit www.KristianStanfill.com for more information on this emerging artist.

Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Crappyness

Ladies and gentlemen, we’ve got an epidemic!

Satan–the enemy of our souls–has silenced too many Christians.

I have been a silent one.
I have been convinced that what I have to say does not matter.
I’ve been duped that I have nothing to contribute.

During my season of silencing, I thought I was being reflective and pensive. It was just part of life. I had the liberty to process. It led to a lot of crappyness in the Kingdom.

Satan’s life is throwing me death.
Satan’s liberty is to torment me.
Satan’s fruit is the pursuit of crappyness.

The lie is I have nothing to say. The truth is that I have more to share than ever before. The lie is that my life is inconsequential and not worth mentioning. The truth is I’ve got the Truth in me and He needs to be shared.

My aim is to advance the Great Commission. When I am too silent, I miss the mark. And missing the mark is the definition of sin. If the Holy Spirit has put something in me and I don’t share it, then I’m grieving Him.

What are you doing with your life? Sitting around watching television, trying to solve the world’s problems from your couch?

What liberties are you living for? The liberty to do whatever you want, whenever you want?

Are you in the pursuit of crappyness?

Assess where you are and ask the Lord what you can improve in your life. Ask Him to show you where you’ve been silent. You may be surprised by what you hear.

Counting the Cost of Discipleship

In September of 2009, I started an Immersion Discipleship Training (IDT) program. Now, a year later, I have much to reflect on.

This week, I started my second year of my IDT student internship at New Song Christian Fellowship in Nashville, Tennessee. It’s safe to say that I’ve been effectively discipled in this last year. I am more proficient in the Word and Spirit. I walk in more power and authority. I also have a lot less free time on my hands.

Biblical discipleship is not that common of a thing. Few churches and Christian communities invest the time in the upcoming generations.

The current trend is quite opposite of what I’m experiencing at New Song. Most leaders today hoard their positions, grasping them with a greedy death grip. New Song’s leaders don’t do that.

Discipleship is expensive! But not necessarily in the monetary sense. Sure books and materials for Bible classes cost money. Yes, the cost of food to feed students is consequential. But the greatest cost of biblical discipleship is time.

Time, talent and treasure. God asks us to sow all of those things into His Kingdom. These triad T’s are being sown into me.

Time
Want to show somebody you love them and care about their future? Invest time in them. Give them the thing that cannot be repaid. Give them the ticking seconds on your life’s clock.

The staff at New Song Christian Fellowship believes in pouring into the next generation and they do it very well.

Talent
Each person is created by God with a unique set of gifts. These gifts are not meant to be exploited for personal gain. Rather, they are designed to be shared. We are created to bless and complement each other. We are meant to work together. We’re weak in some areas so others can be strong and help us with them. Too, we are strong in particular practices so we can practically provide for others. Daily I am strengthened in my weak areas because the staff at New Song share their talents with me and help me refine the talents God gave me.

Treasure
I admit it. Money is important. But money doesn’t make the world go ’round. The earth spins because Jesus holds all of the universe together. We can’t serve two masters, God and money. We have to instead master our money and use it for God’s Kingdom. Numerous people have sown financially into me. I live in a host home rent-free. I’ve received anonymous financial gifts. I’ve gotten gift cards to buy food. My high school mascot was a Pirate. As a Pirate, I really love treasure. 😀

My hope for every person reading this is that you have an opportunity to be discipled. Know Christ better. Grow in your knowledge of the Word. Know that the Bible is not this obscure, impossible to understand book. Realize Christ is alive. Life a life of dynamic power and movement.

If you’re not plugged into a dynamic community of believers, don’t despair. There’s hope for you.

The Lord has impressed it upon the hearts of the New Song leadership to create a resource called Disciple’s Handbook. This way anybody who wants to can be effectively discipled. The Great Commission is carried out through this resource. We’re currently in the process of writing the pilot edition of Disciple’s Handbook. It’s not perfect. There may be a typo or thirty. But we know that it’s God-inspired and Holy Spirit directed. The end result of Disciple’s Handbook will be three editions with 12 lessons. Right now we’re up to lesson seven in edition one. We’re working on writing lesson 11 right now. However, the rest of the book and editions haven’t even been written yet! That’s how fresh this is.

Go to New Song’s website to download the lessons for Disciple’s Handbook. Post a comment and let me know what you think of it!

Pastor Dale Evrist, Senior Pastor of New Song Nashville does a daily Old Testament podcast on iTunes. If you want to grow in understanding the Old Testament and how it applies to you today, listen to his free podcast. It’s full of great truth and life lessons. Download iTunes if you don’t already have it. Here’s a link to his Walking Through the Word Podcast on iTunes.

Consider yourself resourced! I am going to warn you, though. Laying down your life in obedience to Christ is costly. But it’s absolutely worth the investment!

This is My Story, This is My Song

Addison Road releases stories worth listening to on INO Records.

“Stories,” the second INO Records release from Addison Road is anything but sophomoric. The term “sophomore” wouldn’t even apply to this band. “Stories” may be be their second release with INO Records, but the band itself has been together for a long time, releasing other albums before their major label debut.

Packed full of honest, often aching lyrics, “Stories” is authentic. This album is a perfect mix of wreckage and resilience. Recently, the members of Addison Road endured several tragic events, including a bus fire. These events were no doubt difficult, but very obviously kept the band grounded, leading to passionate lyrics in the song “This Little Light.”

The rains will come and the waters rise, but don’t you ever lose your light. In this life you will know love and pain, joy and sorrow. So when it hurts, when times get hard, don’t forget whose child you are.

If you’re wondering if “This Little Light” is anything like the familiar children’s song, you’d be right. At least partially. Addison Road successfully sampled the nostalgia of that song, yet also coupled it with compelling conviction.

Another familiar lyrical reference is included in the final track “My Story.” Strategically placed at the end of the record, “My Story” hearkens back to the beloved hymn, “Blessed Assurance.”

As enjoyable as “This Little Light” and “My Story” are, “Need You Now” is definitely my favorite song on the record. “Need You Now” surprisingly comes across as a victorious worship-like song, featuring the lyrics: Now this is all that I am. Here with my outstretched hands. ‘Cause I really need You. I know that I need You now.

The made-for-the-dance-floor number of “Don’t Wait” captures the listener’s attention musically. However, after further listening, the lyrics steal the attention. One thing that did confuse me about this song is why the topic of death was turned into a techno-pop tune. Perhaps the song was written that way on purpose–to challenge people and make them think about mortality. If that was the goal, then 1 point to Addison Road.

“Stories” is a definitely worth purchasing, as is the band’s self-titled debut release. Addison Road is an endearing band with a devoted following. If you are not yet familiar with them, please introduce yourself to their music. You won’t regret it.

For more information on Addison Road, visit their website at http://www.addisonroad.com.

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