Tag Archives: stories

This is My Story, This is My Song

Addison Road releases stories worth listening to on INO Records.

“Stories,” the second INO Records release from Addison Road is anything but sophomoric. The term “sophomore” wouldn’t even apply to this band. “Stories” may be be their second release with INO Records, but the band itself has been together for a long time, releasing other albums before their major label debut.

Packed full of honest, often aching lyrics, “Stories” is authentic. This album is a perfect mix of wreckage and resilience. Recently, the members of Addison Road endured several tragic events, including a bus fire. These events were no doubt difficult, but very obviously kept the band grounded, leading to passionate lyrics in the song “This Little Light.”

The rains will come and the waters rise, but don’t you ever lose your light. In this life you will know love and pain, joy and sorrow. So when it hurts, when times get hard, don’t forget whose child you are.

If you’re wondering if “This Little Light” is anything like the familiar children’s song, you’d be right. At least partially. Addison Road successfully sampled the nostalgia of that song, yet also coupled it with compelling conviction.

Another familiar lyrical reference is included in the final track “My Story.” Strategically placed at the end of the record, “My Story” hearkens back to the beloved hymn, “Blessed Assurance.”

As enjoyable as “This Little Light” and “My Story” are, “Need You Now” is definitely my favorite song on the record. “Need You Now” surprisingly comes across as a victorious worship-like song, featuring the lyrics: Now this is all that I am. Here with my outstretched hands. ‘Cause I really need You. I know that I need You now.

The made-for-the-dance-floor number of “Don’t Wait” captures the listener’s attention musically. However, after further listening, the lyrics steal the attention. One thing that did confuse me about this song is why the topic of death was turned into a techno-pop tune. Perhaps the song was written that way on purpose–to challenge people and make them think about mortality. If that was the goal, then 1 point to Addison Road.

“Stories” is a definitely worth purchasing, as is the band’s self-titled debut release. Addison Road is an endearing band with a devoted following. If you are not yet familiar with them, please introduce yourself to their music. You won’t regret it.

For more information on Addison Road, visit their website at http://www.addisonroad.com.

Off to the DR

So, it’s finally here!

Tomorrow at 3:45 a.m., I leave for the Dominican Republic! I’m excited! I know God will do a marvelous work in me and through me while I’m away. Please pray for me/our team while we’re gone. i.e. team unity, safety, protection, etc., etc.

Also, for updates while we’re in the DR, read our team blog at http://newsongdrteam.wordpress.com.

I’ll post when we get back with lots of pics, stories, testimonies…

Captive Audience

Tonight I went to my second Murfreesboro Writers’ Group meeting. The first time I went, I read a song I recently wrote while on a plane ride. It was called “Fragmented Patches.” Maybe I’ll post it later. I don’t know. Do you want to read it?

I joined the writers’ group for a few reasons. I want to meet new people. I work at home so I have a limited workplace sphere of influence. Through this group, I can influence people. I haven’t been writing very much and I wanted motivation to start again. I have nothing else to do on the second and fourth Wednesday of every month. I used to have Life Group that night, but ours now meets on the second and fourth Sundays of the month.

This writers’ group is a HUGE witnessing opportunity. Huge. Huge. As you’re surely aware, writing is a deeply personal activity. Writers write what they feel. And, if they claim to have no feelings, they make up characters who have the feelings the writer is denying.

What you may or may not know about writers is that they generally value each other’s work highly. For example, this particular writers’ group is for constructive criticism only. There is no tearing down of work, thought or concepts. There are many compliments. Several people are impressed by other people. A lot of the attendees in this group are writing novels and short stories. I am mostly focusing on poetry. When I read a poem, some of the writers have no concept of how to construct a poem. They are in awe of the entire poetry genre. To them, it’s a terribly interesting thing that they like but don’t know how to do.

As I was casually seated in my oversized Barnes and Noble chair, I quickly realized how crucial this opportunity is for me. I can write about whatever I want and they have to sit there and listen to me. The same goes for them. I have to sit there and listen to whatever they say too.

I am a Christian. My life is Christ. Naturally, I write about Jesus/God/the Holy Spirit/worship. Some of these folks “aren’t religious.” Those are their words, not mine. But they are intrigued by the things I’ve written and shared. They find what I say interesting and eloquent.

That’s good, because I prayed they would. I asked God to soften their hearts and make them receptive to the Truth that I’ll deliver. I also asked Him to protect me from any harmful subject matter that the other writers detail.

My first week, I read the part of a flirty, vampire girl. That’s so not my life. But this lady was writing a play and she needed people to read the lines. That was the part I was given.

I’ve heard stories of other-worldly mutant dogs; vampires; back-from-the-dead brothers; a pre-meditated, adultery-headed man; sword-chasing, sci-fi fantasy characters and a seriously demented mortician. Oh the imagination writers have!

And to that spattering of ideas and fantasies, it’s my task to bring Jesus.

I must be intentional with the stuff I present. I have a captive audience. Literally. In two ways. One, they are captive and must pay attention to what I say. Two, they are captives, bound in the lies of the enemy. With the truth that I share through my poems/songs/potential novels, I will hope they see freedom. And, in turn, desire to grasp that freedom.

So, if you’re reading this and you believe in Jesus, please pray for me. I have a unique and powerful opportunity. I’m very excited. I like being spurred to write again, too. It’s such a catharsis for me. I get a little giddy thinking about the possibilities of the words that will come out.